Tag Archives: upgrading plastic

Uncoupling Devices

Adding uncoupling devices (cut levers) to plastic freight cars

Here’s a crop of an image showing an uncoupling device installed on a flat car. The original photo is from the John W. Barriger III National Railroad Library, a special collection of the St. Louis Mercantile Library.

Peter Hall recently sent details on adding a simple detail to box car ends. Here are Pete’s tips and techniques.

An increasing number of today’s excellent plastic injection-molded HO scale models come with uncoupling devices (cut levers), but we still have all those great models that need them. This article shows how to make simple attachment points and wire cut levers for those cars that need bottom-operated uncoupling devices.

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Royal F and Universal Slack Adjusters

George Toman returns with a technique to build fairly common underframe details. Here’s George with the scoop. Click on any image here to review a larger size.

Detailing freight car underframes has always been a high priority with me. A couple of common slack adjusters are the Royal F Type and Universal Type. I found these fairly easy to replicate using styrene. My goal was to develop a method to accurately construct these parts using common tools. One can be seen in the lead image mounted behind to the brake cylinder on a Milwaukee Road ribside box car.

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Frank’s Models, pt 1

Resin Car Works Chief Frank Hodina was recently trackside and grabbed a batch of photos to share on the blog. Here are his notes. Click on any image here to review a larger size.

I hadn’t taken any model photos recently and thought I should document some of my HO scale fleet on a sceniced portion of the layout. I had installed new LED lights on a portion of the layout and I wanted to see how these look under 6500 Kelvin lights. We lead off with Illinois Central 8976, an old, out-of-the-box Life-Like P2K GP-7. Extras details include MU receptacles, speed recorder, air lines to the truck brake cylinders, a new brass horn, cloth sunshades, and Chet French positioned as the engineer. Chet’s a longtime friend and a retired IC engineer. Chet also knows just about everything and anything you could want to know about the IC.

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