Workbench Wednesday

Malcolm H. Houck has been working on a couple of brass locomotive projects and sent a progress image of his NYO&W Class S 2-8-0 Double Cab. The railroad did not use the “Camelback” term for these locos.

The tender shell was formed from 0.010-inch brass sheet. A NWSL Riveter with a fence for positioning was used to impress the rivets. A new die was made from 01 oil hardening tool steel and finished with a bit of home alchemy heat treating. Malcolm snapped this shot to illustrate a temporary “lay-up” with the major locomotive parts at hand.

What’s on your workbench?

RCW December update

Photo from the Richard Hendrickson Collection.

Here’s news from RCW honcho Frank Hodina.

Resin Car Works is going on hold until the New Year. The holidays are compounding our commitments with family activities and a vacation for a couple of weeks.

We had the best of intentions, but the UTLX Class X kit is a bust! No additional models will be produced. I don’t know what it is about the model, but I just don’t like how it has turned out. If I had known what I know now I would have saved many people a lot of work. I don’t like wasting time. We apologize if you were looking forward to these kits but there have been too many difficulties in the production process and additional product will not be released.

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Photo Backdrops

Extending the scene

Clark Propst had a well attended presentation at RPM Chicagoland covering many aspects of his latest layout. He sent details on his layout backdrop work for the latest blog post. Here’s Clark with the scoop.

Mountainous terrain has always been appealing to modelers interested in scenery. Mountains are easily made with the hardshell method or stacking insulating foam board. The basic form is then covered with rock castings, trees, or a combination of both. Modeling the flatlands of America is more difficult. Horizontal scenes look bare when pushed up against a vertical backdrop painted sky blue.

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