Category Archives: Models

Virtual RPM 2

A few extra details can transform a plastic kit into a reflection of prototype practices.
A few extra details can transform a plastic kit into a reflection of prototype practices.

Fenton Wells sent along several photos of recent HO scale kit builds. Follow along for the details. Click on any image here to review a larger size.

All of these freight car kits are recent projects. Not all of these are resin kits but some are kit bashed with resin parts. The lead photo here is of Canadian National 472966, a 10-foot interior height InterMountain (formerly Red Caboose) kit with Sylvan Hutchins roof and NSC-1 ends.

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Milwaukee Road caboose build

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If we model freight cars, we usually need a caboose at some point. George Toman shares tips and techniques to build a classic Milwaukee Road caboose.

This Milwaukee Road caboose project started out simple. I just wanted to take it out of the box and weather it up. As I researched photos I discovered that the Walthers Model was inaccurate for a 1939 version and decided to upgrade the model to reflect a 1944 version of a shop built Milwaukee Road rib side caboose.

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End sill details

These freight cars have three different couplers installed. At the far right are Kadee #5 with Kadee #58 on the middle two cars. The trip pin has been snipped on the C&O box car. The hopper at left has Accurail Proto:HO couplers installed without the trip pin.
These freight cars have three different couplers installed. At the far right is a Kadee #5 with Kadee #58 on the middle two cars. The trip pin has been snipped on the C&O box car. The hopper at left has Accurail Proto:HO couplers installed without the trip pin.

Blog manager Eric Hansmann steps in with some thoughts about details on the end of freight cars.

To snip or not to snip, that is the question. I’ve been installing couplers without trip pins for about a decade. Many modelers notice the missing trip pins and ask why would I do such a thing. In 2005, I realized I was not going to have a layout using magnetic uncoupling and the club layout where much of my equipment was in service also did not use magnetic uncoupling. Building models without trip pins was an easy personal choice. Click on any image here to review a larger size.

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